Meeting Notes for Mar. 8, 2017

 President elect Richard DeRock introduces Rotary exchange student Putter, from Thailand

President elect Richard DeRock introduces Rotary exchange student Putter, from Thailand

This week we welcomed two Rotary exchange students, Putter and Olivia, from Thailand and Australia respectively as our guest speakers. It was an illuminating and educational presentation about two vastly different nations and cultures that are both fascinating. Please take some time to connect with President-elect Richard and ask about these amazing kids. We encourage you to connect with them while they are in our district! 

Guests included Kevin Rimes.

Happy Bucks:  

  • $1 from Richard for more snow in the forests, which is a good thing
  • $1 from Rob for being home in Waterville after working in California
  • $1 from Martin for his daughter Clare, who just won a major playwriting award
  • $1 from Greg, for his optimism in chartering a bus to take baseball players to Yakima, even though it was snowing the night before
  • $1 from Earl, who got to see his grandkids recently

Announcements

Then we welcomed three new members to the group! 

Welcome new WNR members Jeremy French, Patrick Bodell and Dr. Cameron Alexander. We're glad to welcome you to our club, and Rotary International! 

dom's book corner

 An illuminating look into the stark realities of too many modern American homes in communities left in the lurch of the once-vibrant industrial and manufacturing economy of the midwest. 

An illuminating look into the stark realities of too many modern American homes in communities left in the lurch of the once-vibrant industrial and manufacturing economy of the midwest. 

If you read one book this year, make it this book. J.D. Vance is 31. My age. So you may ask yourself: what does this young guy have to write a memoir about? Well to start with he's the survivor of a childhood domestic situation that'll make your stomach churn. Drug addicted mother, absent father, and a string of male authority figures who cared little to nothing about him. A crushing, ever-present, ceaseless poverty and no hope for any real future that doesn't involve a teenage pregnancy and/or alcohol and drug abuse. Yet there's a ray of sunshine – his hillbilly grandparents. They gave him the stability and shelter this clearly brilliant youngster needed to get his stuff together enough to join the Marines and then later attend and graduate from Yale Law School, as an editor of the esteemed law review no less. He now works in finance and is an all-around success with a bright future in politics (I know I'd vote for him).

I found this book sad, but hopeful. Optimisitc, yet realistic about the sorry state of affairs in which we find too many communities across this country. It's an unfiltered look into the terrible reality that is too many chaotic homes for too many kids in this, the supposedly greatest country on earth. 

- WNR Secretary Dominick Bonny