Meeting Notes for Mar. 15, 2017

 Laurel Helton, with Make A Difference Day, accepts her Paul Harris Fellowship on March 15

Laurel Helton, with Make A Difference Day, accepts her Paul Harris Fellowship on March 15

Guests: Rotarians: Dan Feil (Eastmont Rotary); Assistant D G Carol Adamson and Jim of (Sunrise Rotary); Robin DeRock (Sunrise Rotary); Jim Russell (Wenatchee Rotary)  non-Rotarians: Margie Kerr; Curt and Laurel Helton

President Kevin led-off the meeting with his special thought of the day by reminiscing about St. Patrick and how the tradition began and continues today. At the end he reminded all of us to wear green on Friday the 17th and drink green beer.

We were treated to an invitation, by Laurel Helton, to again participate in Make A Difference Day on Saturday, October 28th with a meaningful community project. This program was initiated in 1991 by one of our guests Margie Kerr and her sister Betsy Tontini. Our community won a major award from USA Today magazine for its outstanding volunteer efforts that first year. Under Laurel's leadership the program today is even strongerand has become a major event in the Greater Wenatchee Area. During the past 3 years the Wenatchee North Rotary Club, in partnership with the WVC Baseball Team and members of Grace Lutheran Church, have devoted their efforts to help restore damage to the victims of disastrous fires in the region.

Then Earl Tilly surprised Laurel by presenting her with a Paul Harris Fellow award in honor of her unselfish leadership in making our community a better place to live via Make A Difference Day and her other activities.
 

Program:

 WNR member Ivan Christiansen posing with Wenatchee Rotary Club president Jim Russell

WNR member Ivan Christiansen posing with Wenatchee Rotary Club president Jim Russell

Ivan starts a fundraising frenzy!

Our program today was by Jim Russell (president of the Wenatchee Rotary Club) who extended an invitation for all Rotarians to support the April 7th R I D-5060 Million Dollar Dinner. In addition to explaining what the programs in Rotary this campaign will support he also stressed the partnerships that Rotary has in the effort to eradicate Polio in the world. This cause got started in the mid-1980's by then RI President Ed Cadman and has been a very high priority of the RI Foundation to this very day.

Jim told us that there are many "easy" ways for Rotarians to give in this project that will result from our individual contributions; whether it be cash, appreciated assets, or becoming a Benefactor will be matched by the Gates Foundation. There is more information on the District 5060 website that gives more details. Or you can call Jim at 860-0675.

At the conclusion of Jim's compelling presentation our fellow member Ivan Christiansen created a challenge and an opportunity for our members. Ivan opened an envelope and presented the club with 5 $100 bills that can be matched for another member to become a Paul Harris Fellow. Before the meeting ended there was $1,750 on the table from several members.  All told we raised about $3,000 today! Who will be the next Paul Harris Fellow? Hopefully the mystery will be solved and revealed at our next meeting.

If you were unable to attend today's meeting there are still opportunities to join in helping, like Ivan and others did by supporting the Million dollar campaign.

Next week's meeting will be by the new Executive Director (Curt Soper) of the Chelan-Douglas Land Trust.

Notes by Earl Tilly. 

dom's book corner

 Aldous Huxley was a visionary. This classic published in 1932 is a frightening dystopian tale.  

Aldous Huxley was a visionary. This classic published in 1932 is a frightening dystopian tale.  

This dystopian horror story makes George Orwell's "1984" look like "Eat, Pray, Love." It makes "The Matrix" look like "Mr. Roger's Neighborhood." From what I hear, there's something of a revival of dystopian books among the modern lit scene (wonder why). So I decided to revisit this classic novel I mostly digested ala' Cliffsnotes to pass quizzes/tests in high school, and I'm glad I did. It's disturbing and poignant and beautiful and sad and utterly breathtaking in its scope and vision.

It's one of those books that changes the way you think about society, technology, biology, religion, poetry, literature and the list goes on. It makes you appreciate so many, many things about how great things actually are nowadays. We're far from perfect but at least we still have Shakespeare, am I right?

Speaking of which The Taming of the Shrew is coming to the PAC soon.